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Dr Rebecca Mitchell, Dr Sybil Bravo, Dr Fatima Shajahan and Shimu Akhter present during the third webinar on COVID-19 and O&G for Pacific O&G specialists, trainees, midwives and others working in women’s health in the Pacific.

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Call to Action – Towards the Elimination of Cervical Cancer in the Pacific Islands



Delegates from the following countries and organisations met in Suva, Fiji on 5-6
December 2019 and agreed the Call to Action below:

Delegates from Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Kiribati, Federated States
of Micronesia, Fiji and Samoa together with representatives of the Pacific Society for
Reproductive Health, Papua New Guinea Obstetrics and Gynaecology Society, Fiji
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Society, Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research,
Cervical Cancer Prevention in the Pacific, The Pacific Community (SPC), VCS Foundation,
Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Kirby
Institute at the University of New South Wales, Family Planning Australia, Australian
Cervical Cancer Foundation, Fiji Cancer Society, Fiji National University, University of
Otago, National University of Samoa and Victoria University. Also present were
representatives of the United Nations Population Fund and the United Nations Children’s
Fund.
We agreed to the following principles:

  1. We support the global target to achieve elimination of cervical cancer as a public
    health problem, noting the current high burden of cervical cancer in the Pacific
    and the current lack of adequate vaccination, screening and treatment.
  2. In line with the World Health Organization (WHO) draft targets for 2030, in the
    Pacific our targets are:

    1. a. 90% of girls are fully vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) by
      15 years of age.
    2. b. 70% of women have had an HPV screening test between 30 – 39 years of
      age and a second HPV test between 40 – 49 years of age1.
    3. c. 90% of women identified with cervical pre-cancer and cancer have
      received appropriate treatment and care
  3. We support the principles of equity in striving for the elimination of cervical
    cancer in the Pacific so that no woman or community is left behind.
  4. We support the principle of meaningful collaboration between Pacific Island
    nations in planning, procurement and knowledge sharing.

We are committed to the following actions:

  1. Raising awareness of cervical cancer in the Pacific and its impact on families and
    communities and strengthening advocacy for elimination.
  2. Vaccination
    Exploring funding options including public-private partnerships for ongoing HPV
    vaccination in the Pacific.
    These two tests should be 10 years apart. Clinically validated PCR based tests should be used.
  3. Urging Pacific Island governments to include HPV vaccination against HPV onto
    existing immunization schedules.
  4. Screening
    Urging Pacific Island governments to transition to the delivery of effective cervical
    cancer screening with HPV testing and pre-cancer treatment services.
    Consideration should be given to self-collection of vaginal samples in order to
    facilitate scale up and acceptability.
  5. Treatment:
    Urging cooperation between Pacific Island Governments to establish a treatment
    centre for cervical cancer, including radiotherapy, to act as a referral hub within
    the Pacific.
  6. Workforce:
    Assisting Pacific Island governments and training agencies to develop an essential
    workforce for the delivery of HPV vaccination, cervical cancer screening and the
    management of cervical cancer.
  7. Registry establishment:
    Assisting in establishing an adequate registry to record information about
    vaccination, screening and treatment for the prevention of cervical cancer; and
    with potential linkage to a cancer registry. This will facilitate follow-up of the
    young with incomplete vaccination and women through the screening pathway. It
    will also enable robust monitoring and evaluation of vaccination and screening
    program performance.

For more information, please email/call any of the following:
Professor Alec Ekeroma, HOD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology,
University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. E: alec.ekeroma@otago.ac.nz; M:
+64212767975.
Professor Diana Sarfati, Head of Department, Public Health, University of Otago,
Wellington, New Zealand. diana.sarfati@otago.ac.nz
Professor Marion Saville, Executive Director, VCS Foundation, Melbourne, Australia.
E: msaville@vcs.org.au

News

Recent WHO work and important documents by partners

Recent WHO work and important documents by partners in the area of Reproductive Health, Maternal-Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health (RMNCAH) and health through the life-course (April 2018)

Protecting, promoting, and supp
1.Protecting, promoting, and supporting breastfeeding in facilities providing maternity and newborn services: the revised Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative 2018 Implementation Guidance.

WHO and UNICEF issued new ten-step guidance to increase support for breastfeeding in health facilities that provide maternity and newborn services. The updated guidance is intended for all those who set policy for, or offer care to, pregnant women, families and infants: governments; national managers of maternal and child health programmes in general, and of breastfeeding- and Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI)-related programmes in particular; and health-facility managers at different levels (facility directors, medical directors, chiefs of maternity and neonatal wards). The document presents the first revision of the Ten Steps since 1989. The topic of each step is unchanged, but wording has been updated in line with evidence-based guidelines and global health policy.
http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/infantfeeding/bfhi-implementation/en/
Related documents

2 .Standards for improving the quality of care for children and young adolescents in health facilities

On 24 April 2018, WHO launched Standards for improving quality of care for children and young adolescents in health facilities. These paediatric standards take into consideration a child’s right to health while recognizing that their health; physical, psychosocial, developmental and communication needs differ from those of adults.

3. Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS)

A well-functioning CRVS system registers all births and deaths, issues birth and death certificates, and compiles and disseminates vital statistics, including cause of death information. It may also record marriages and divorces. Despite the well-documented benefits of CRVS, many countries do not have adequate systems in place. The births of tens of millions of children are known to be unregistered every year, and it is estimated that two-thirds of deaths are never registered. WHO and UNICEF called for greater commitment to strengthen CRVS systems.

 
4. Factsheets

 
5. WHO publications/information

News

News from the Secretariat

PSRH wishes to announce its Biennial Conference scheduled for July 2019 to be held in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

  • Host Country: Papua New Guinea
  • Dates: July 6 – 11th July
  • Pre-conference workshops: 6-8th July (Medical School, University of PNG)
  • Conference: 9 – 11th July
  • Venue: Stanley Hotel, Port Moresby
  • Theme: Pacific Experience for Pacific Solutions in Reproductive Health”

Please check PSRH website for more information.