0 All Booked All Booked All Booked 116 PEMNeT Workshop http://psrh.org.nz/?event=holy-shift-strategic-think&event_date=1970-01-01&reg=1 https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr 1970-01-01

PEMNeT Workshop


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December 15, 2017 10:57 pm December 15, 2017 10:57 pm Europe/London PEMNeT Workshop

PEMNeT Facilitator workshop flyer 2017 Sharron Bolitho The need for an emergency skills course that was appropriate for the Pacific Island context was envisaged by the Pacific Society for Reproductive Health (PSRH) and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologist (RANZCOG) when they jointly developed a course in 2006. The PEMNeT Manual was instigated by the PSRH Board in July 2014 and we aimed to involve key Pacific clinicians in its creation. We hope that in doing so, we have captured the diversity of experience, develop scholastic capacity in our workforce and with clinician buy-in, improve utilization and dissemination of this work. Emergency obstetric care includes several interventions that address the major causes of maternal mortality and morbidity. If appropriate and timely actions are initiated by these care providers, the risk of adverse outcomes is mitigated.   The training is targeting all cadres of health workers who care for women in pregnancy and assist women in childbirth. Dr Sharron Bolitho is the Workshop Leader and outlined below is her report from the recent workshop. Further workshops are part funded by New Zealand Aid via Counties Manukau DHB and will commence early next year. Vanuatu 2017 PSRH Preconference Workshop Report Pacific Emergency Maternal and Neonatal Training Facilitator’s Workshop. The PEMNeT Facilitator Workshop was held at the Nursing School at Vila Central hospital Port Vila from the 13th to the 15th of July. The faculty was 50% Pacific based; Paula Puawe, Jessie Yapupu, Anna Jatobatu, Dr Kevin Bisili, Dr Boniface Damutalau and 50% NZ/UK based Dr Tim Draycott, Dr. Martin Sowter, Tina Hewitt, Beatrice Treadwell and myself. The workshop had been planned based on 20 participants, however 44 attended.  The space allocated was also half the size that we were originally advised would be available.  Although it was great so many people wanted to attend, this caused some additional complexity with logistics around insufficient facilitator guides and manuals and also limited room available to do practical work.   These issues were commented on in the participant and faculty feedback.  A particular recurring theme is that the participants wanted more hands-on practice time.  However, be that as it may, all credit to the facilitator team who rose to the occasion and did a grand job with the resources available.  This is the benefit of having faculty who are experienced at working in a Pacific setting, who are able to troubleshoot and go with the flow without becoming overly stressed.  It was also a chance to model the good teamwork and communication skills we emphasising in the training! The programme is attached. Based on the principles of adult learning of, explain what you are going to do, demonstrate what you want the participants do allow the participants time to practice participants demonstrate to the facilitators, The basic structure of the course was; Day 1 PEMNeT Principles and how to use the Facilitator’s guide explanation, and facilitators demonstration on how to run roleplays and skills stations, using some participants as participants ie; they get a chance to see what it would be like to attend a course. Day 2 Workshop Participants practice giving […]

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PEMNeT Facilitator workshop flyer 2017 Sharron Bolitho

The need for an emergency skills course that was appropriate for the Pacific Island context was envisaged by the Pacific Society for Reproductive Health (PSRH) and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologist (RANZCOG) when they jointly developed a course in 2006. The PEMNeT Manual was instigated by the PSRH Board in July 2014 and we aimed to involve key Pacific clinicians in its creation. We hope that in doing so, we have captured the diversity of experience, develop scholastic capacity in our workforce and with clinician buy-in, improve utilization and dissemination of this work. Emergency obstetric care includes several interventions that address the major causes of maternal mortality and morbidity. If appropriate and timely actions are initiated by these care providers, the risk of adverse outcomes is mitigated.

 

The training is targeting all cadres of health workers who care for women in pregnancy and assist women in childbirth.

Dr Sharron Bolitho is the Workshop Leader and outlined below is her report from the recent workshop. Further workshops are part funded by New Zealand Aid via Counties Manukau DHB and will commence early next year.

Vanuatu 2017 PSRH Preconference Workshop Report

Pacific Emergency Maternal and Neonatal Training Facilitator’s Workshop.

The PEMNeT Facilitator Workshop was held at the Nursing School at Vila Central hospital Port Vila from the 13th to the 15th of July.

The faculty was 50% Pacific based; Paula Puawe, Jessie Yapupu, Anna Jatobatu, Dr Kevin Bisili, Dr Boniface Damutalau and 50% NZ/UK based Dr Tim Draycott, Dr. Martin Sowter, Tina Hewitt, Beatrice Treadwell and myself.

The workshop had been planned based on 20 participants, however 44 attended.  The space allocated was also half the size that we were originally advised would be available.  Although it was great so many people wanted to attend, this caused some additional complexity with logistics around insufficient facilitator guides and manuals and also limited room available to do practical work.   These issues were commented on in the participant and faculty feedback.  A particular recurring theme is that the participants wanted more hands-on practice time.  However, be that as it may, all credit to the facilitator team who rose to the occasion and did a grand job with the resources available.  This is the benefit of having faculty who are experienced at working in a Pacific setting, who are able to troubleshoot and go with the flow without becoming overly stressed.  It was also a chance to model the good teamwork and communication skills we emphasising in the training!

The programme is attached. Based on the principles of adult learning of,

  • explain what you are going to do,
  • demonstrate what you want the participants do
  • allow the participants time to practice
  • participants demonstrate to the facilitators,

The basic structure of the course was;

Day 1 PEMNeT Principles and how to use the Facilitator’s guide explanation, and facilitators demonstration on how to run roleplays and skills stations, using some participants as participants ie; they get a chance to see what it would be like to attend a course.

Day 2 Workshop Participants practice giving presentations and running activities and drills in country groups and then demonstrate to the whole group

Day 3  Explanations of how to set up your own PEMNeT workshop. Participants then worked in country groups to make an implementation plan and fed this back to the whole group.

As the point of the course was for participants to acquire skills and knowledge on how to run a course and have a chance to practice it was not possible to cover every topic in the manual.  Therefore after discussion within the faculty, we chose the topics we thought most appropriate eg PPH because it is the top cause of maternal death worldwide.

Topics chosen from the manual covered were;

  • Why mothers and babies die
  • Teamwork and communication
  • Preeclampsia-eclampsia
  • Shoulder dystocia
  • Breech
  • Postpartum haemorrhage
  • Sepsis
  • Essential early newborn care
  • Newborn resuscitation

Participant feedback on the agreement feedback scale was overwhelmingly positive and useful answers to the questions on the form are summarised below;

  • What advice do you have for the facilitators?
    1. Pre and post test
    2. Share more real cases
    3. Include more topics
    4. Send manuals out in advance
    5. Manual on a flashdrive
    6. Do the role plays in the hospital, not a classroom
    7. Bigger room, more handbooks, better time management ( as above these issues due to number of participants and space available)
  • What other topics would you like to see in PEMNeT?
    1. Pregnancy loss stillbirth, birth crisis
    2. Manual removal of placenta
    3. Inverted uterus
    4. Diabetes
    5. multiple pregnancy
    6. Prolonged labour
    7. APH
    8. Epilepsy
    9. cord prolapse
    10. how to make a proposal
    11. how to audit
  • What will you do to improve care as a result of this course
    1. Share learning
    2. Run drills/skills at own place
    3. Include all health staff in training
    4. Use an early warning score
    5. Make up emergency boxes
    6. Have more confidence in running emergencies
    7. Hold meetings with health managers
    8. Teach teamwork skills

Finally suggestions from the course faculty and reflections from myself.

More time is needed for practical hands-on practice.  All presentations need to be shortened , less words per slide , less slides and more pictures, more practical demos in front of class and examples of poor and good teaching methods. More interactive exercise and groupwork demos. Demonstrations on how to use exercises to make local protocols etc

I am aware that workshops are offered primarily to participants from the PSRH conference host country.   It appears that there were 2 groups of people attending this workshop. Those who wanted to be facilitators and run the programme in their home country ( whom this course was aimed at) and others who wanted  a PEMNeT course rather than facilitator training ie be a participant rather than be involved in running PEMNeT in future.   To accommodate both groups of people in a host country I suggest a change in format for future courses.  The format could be a 2 day facilitator training course, followed immediately by the trainee facilitators running a real 2 day course with the supervision and guidance of the faculty.  The LOC would need to be closely involved with the workshop leader to sort who goes into which course.  The advantages are the trainee facilitators get a chance to practice on real participants with support and will gain confidence that they can run this back home.  Also those who want to be a participant only in a course get a chance to and all learning needs are met.

As all are aware there is a plan to revise the PEMNeT Facilitator’s Guide. Based on the facilitator team’s  experience using it at this workshop and my previous experience in running a Facilitator workshop in Auckland 2016 and supporting Pacific clinicians to run their own workshops the following areas are some suggested to be included in the revision.

  • The teamwork section and resources needs fleshing out.
  • Also chapters to be added on,
    • how to teach adults in the Pacific
    • how to set up a course in your health facility,
    • how to write a proposal for management,
    • how to audit your course,
    • how to make low cost props.
  • Include the following proformas basic programme examples, a feedback form, an attendance register, an attendance certificate, a basic early warning score and a handover tool
  • Flashcard resources need to be printed on one side only so that they can be cut out if photocopying is not available.
  • A whole page A4 ‘posters’or flipchart style that can be held up if powerpoint not available.
  • Simplified A4 sized protocol posters.
  • Include more pictures and diagrams for practical skills.

Finally, I would like to thank all those involved for all their hard work, the LOC, the volunteers, the nursing school at Vila Central, the funding partners, the PSRH Board and secretariat and of course the facilitators and participants for a very successful and popular course.  What a great team effort!

Nga mihi nui

Dr Sharon Bolitho